Game reviews and editorials. Simple, and clear.

Developer: Rocksteady Studios
Publisher: DC Entertainment, Eidos Interactive, Warner Brothers Interactive Entertainment, Square-Enix (JP)
Genre: Action/Adventure
Release Date: PS3, 360 –
September 2, 2009 (AU)
August 25, 2009 (NA)
August 28, 2009 (EU)
Windows – 
September 15, 2009 (NA)
September 18, 2009 (EU)
Rating: T
MSRP: $59.99

Batman: Arkham Asylum took everything a fan of the series could ever want out of the series, and placed it effectively into what could be one of the best games I have played in 2009. With plenty of gadgets, familiar and not-so-familiar faces, and a whole cast of brilliant voices, Batman left little room for error. The Dark Knight punched, kicked and silently took down much opposition to become a solid contender for the prestigious title of one of the best games I have ever played.

I am not usually the super hero gamer type, but what intrigued me to pick up this game were the voices they chose to use for the characters. Batman, Harley and Joker were the original voice actors from Batman: The Animated Series, a cartoon t hat I grew up on as a child. That alone was enough to excite me to purchase this game come launch day. Little did I know what an incredible game I was picking up.

The tale starts off showing Batman, who is driving The Joker back to Arkham Asylum. The slightly deranged clown had escaped, but as always, Batman has subdued the maniacal clown once more, and peace has returned to Gotham. That is what The Joker wants everyone to believe, because little does anyone know what The Joker has in store. Instead of The Joker being put away, the whole island is locked down, with everyone inside playing pawns to The Joker’s master plan. Batman must retake Arkham Asylum back from The Joker, or face having to see Gotham City a simple crater on the map. No sweat right? The game does a lot to bring fans both new and old something that they are looking for.

Right off the ‘bat’, the game is absolutely gorgeous. There is so much detail and time taken to perfect everything within the game, from the ghastly environments, to every single pore on Bruce’s face. I was simply blown away by the sheer beauty of the game, and with the Unreal Engine running at full steam, the game is given such a sense of realism, there would be no shame in finding out if Arkham Asylum actually existed. All of the character models are proportionate and gorgeous, fleshing out the characters in ways I never thought possible. At times, the grunts look a little goofy, especially when Batman kicks them in the shins, and they grab their skulls like it was just smashed into a wall. It is a minor flaw, but nothing that would deem the game horrid to watch. The eerie atmosphere gives a perfect taste to what the world of Batman should look like. Also, the models used in the game and during movie sequences are the same, so the game can enter and exit a movie with no transition, and no sacrifice of graphical quality.

Batman plays very fluidly, and with little effort, anyone can pick up a controller and start playing with little to no difficulty. The combos are called ‘freeflow combos,’ and it is ideal for this game.  However, it takes skill, precision and patience to master the combat mechanics. A player can get by a good third of the game simply spamming the attack buttons, however that will not get anyone far after a certain point. The fighting system is based off of a very fluid combo style system, where each attack mixed with a directional button will seamlessly allow Batman to move from one henchman to another with no delay. His acrobatics in between are impressive as well. Batman is also outfitted with a variety of gadgets (unlocked through progression) to neutralize his foes. His trusty batarangs, of course,  are offered from the start. I really tried hard to find a flaw in the combat system, but outside of my own errors, the system is flawless. It provides the ideal amount of button input with careful planning to ensure that you retain the highest combo while fighting the villains.

There is an experience based system that is incorporated within the game that allows for unlockable upgrades  for Batman, such as more gadgets, enhancements to said gadgets, more health, and so on. The experience you gain also restores any stamina that was lost during a fight. I completed the game on hard and felt that nine times out of ten, the game was ideal in difficulty. There was a boss fight or two that I did get stuck on for quite some time (including the final fight) but nothing that made me want to quit the game. Once all of the upgrades are unlocked, however, the experience system becomes nothing more than a tack on. Assuming that the player has reached this far in the game, there really is no need for health recovery as by now it should be easy to dispatch foes, or die. Something I am a little disappointed about is the lack of being able to use any of Batman’s vehicles. One of the neat perks to being Batman is the various modes of transportation he had at his disposal. While the gadgets are cool, nothing beats racing around in the Batmobile.

Batman has a sort of investigation mode called ‘detective mode’ that allows him to pick up various inputs and use those as a tracer to find things. For example, if he is looking for an individual, and they have left a trail of blood, this ‘detective mode’ will pick up a sample, and match that blood to any spots of blood on the island. This mode also allows you to see through walls and pick up any foes that would otherwise be hidden. The Riddler doesn’t make his appearance as an adversary for Batman per say, however he has left over 200 riddles and hidden things for Batman to find. These could be anything from finding green question mark trophies to solving a riddle using the environment and ‘detective mode.’

The ambient music in Arkham Asylum does a wonderful job setting a darker tone. The wavering shadows, paired with the screams and grunts of the tenants are all amplified by a haunting soundtrack that not only sets the mood, but has traces of that ‘batman feel.’ I will admit, none of the songs had me singing long after the game was shut off, and I certainly won’t be rushing to any import stores to find it, but it does well for what it is being used for: creating suitable atmosphere.

Something that really intrigued me about this game is the unlockables and collectables within the game. They are not the every day run-of-the-mill unlockable, this much is true, but it adds more value to the player by actually being USEFUL. First, there are the typical unlockables which come in the form of these side missions you can do. One set of the missions is focused on silent takedowns, and the other is focused on freeflow combos. There are also full scaled models of the characters within the game, allowing the players to appreciate just how much detail went into each character.  Finally, there are the character bios. These were by far the most incredible unlockable I’ve run across in a game in quite some time. The character bios not only show you the character in more of a comic book format, but give you a detailed explanation of where they came from, their background, and some of their stats. There are a few characters who even have interview tapes that give a bit more depth about what makes each one tick. For those of us (like myself) who do not follow Batman religiously, this made me insanely curious to exactly how the relationship between Batman and some of the characters played out before they landed in Arkham. Unfortunately, some of those comics are almost a century old. Content like this though adds so much more to a game than simply trophies or achievements. There was so much history written in just those 25 or so bios that I felt compelled to keep learning more.

I know there are a lot of positive adjectives in this review, and it is for good reason. Batman: Arkham Asylum is an extremely well crafted game capturing the elements in gaming that define this industry for what it is: creative and artistic. When the game is completed, the player will also notice the large team that was used to engineer such a game, and with good reason. There are very few details missed, with little wiggle room. Batman: Arkham Asylum is one of those few games I would consider a masterpiece. It is not flawless, but has such great value not only to gamers, but to fans of the series. When a company can take a franchise as epic as Batman and reinvent the look and feel without losing what makes Batman the superhero that he is, you have acquired a rare talent. Arkham Asylum does just that.

Overall: 9.5 / 10.0

Likes:
+Incredible ‘Freeflow’ combat system
+Beautiful Graphics
+Perfect match of difficulty and length

Dislikes:
-Few flaws in animations
-Music doesn’t truly stand out
-Lack of diversity in villains

Innovative:
~Batman: Reinvented and nostalgic
~Stealth mode shows MGS is not the standard
~Detective Mode adds a fun element to finding new objectives

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